Short notes on Monte Alban and Teotihuacan


Monte Alban was founded by the Zapotec in about 500 BC in southern Mexico, the Valley of Oaxaca.  The city served as the Zapotec people’s capital and was home to nobility from all Zapotec settlements of the region of the Valley of Oaxaca.  It served the people well for well over 1200 years, shrinking in population by the year 700 AD.  The city was home to as many as 25,000 people at its height in the 6th century AD.  The city was made up of a number of different residiential districts, pyramids, and the famous Palacio de los Danzantes, Palace of the Dancers.  The culture of the Zapotecs of Monte Alban was significantly influenced by the Olmec.

Teotihuacan was a vast city in the basin of present-day Mexico.  Its founders and original inhabitants are completely unknown.  Its name means “place of the gods” in Nahuatl.  Nahuatl is the language of many indigeneous peoples in Mexico, particularly the Aztecs, who donned the city with its name after they began its occupation.  It was home to as many as 200,000 residents.  It’s landholdings covered 12 square miles.  It had about 600 pyramids!  The two most famous pyramids of the city were (and are) the Pyramid of the Sun, which is more than 215ft high and half a million square feet at its base, and the Pyramid of the moon.  The city was an economic powerhouse and was home to a considerable force of artisans, agriculturalists and craftsmen.

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1 Comment

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One response to “Short notes on Monte Alban and Teotihuacan

  1. susandjohnston

    So, are you leaning toward the land of 600 pyramids or the valley?

    On Mon, Feb 11, 2013 at 2:18 PM, eclecticspot

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